Archive for the 'shares' Category

scars, failure, disorder & distortion

October 23, 2012
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well-behaved women seldom make history

September 8, 2012

A really interesting article I couldn’t help sharing. http://justinemusk.com/2011/06/10/because-well-behaved-women-seldom-make-history-redefining-what-it-means-to-be-bad/

She could have echoed Laurel Ulrich’s famous comment that “well-behaved women seldom make history” and pointed out that ‘bad’ doesn’t have to mean shallow and self-destructive. It can mean cutting against the traditional good-girl dictates of passive and pretty and pleasing and quiet. It can mean speaking up against the status quo, the double standard, the beauty myth. It can mean rejecting the idea that your moral nature depends not on what you do, but on what you don’t do (have sex).

She could have said: If you’re going to be ‘bad’, make it MEAN SOMETHING…other than self-sabotage.

But what Witherspoon seemed to be getting at in her declaration of herself as a “good girl” has to do with the idea of exposure. Whether it’s a reality TV show or an unfortunate cell phone picture, a good girl does not show herself to the world in this way — or if she does, she “hides her face”.

She guards her shame.

She never makes eye contact.

A “good” girl is not only virginal – and thus qualifies as morally sound, even if, like Jessica Wakefield in the Sweet Valley High novels, she’s kind of a sociopath – but modest and quiet. She covers up. She is seen – without being seen. She talks in a nice voice and smiles a lot. She’s the angel of the house, and stays in the house, which was the historical point of this exercise in the first place.

She’s not loud or opinionated, she doesn’t rock the boat, and she doesn’t draw attention to herself.

‘Goodness’, then, seems to involve an amputation of the self. You make yourself ‘good’ to be loved and accepted, and in the process sacrifice your authenticity. You give yourself away until you no longer know who you are – assuming you ever did.

Like Olympia staring out at the viewer — like Manet breaking the rules to paint her — you can reject the game and make a new one.

You can invent a new truth.

Olympia has come down to us through the ages. She refuses to “hide her face”. She is shamelessly comfortable in her own skin. She exudes a badass presence.

Her critics, now, are dust.

And then look around. “Mujhe/Ammi ko to bas shareef se aik larki chahiye.”

Oh! Found another one.

daybreak/greatest ending song ever

September 2, 2012

 

“the greatest ending credit song ever”

 

“An excellent piece. Calm, yet energetic, as if saying: “Rest, the fighting is over for now.”

Thanks for the upload.”

 

One of these days, one of these days.

highlight reel

August 12, 2012

One of the best parts of any sitcom show is where you see the actors laughing for real, almost breaking off from their characters. Its always pleasing to watch because it just reminds you that its all entertainment in the end, that you should just have fun to the max. Above, in the embedded video, is another such instance, only on a tv wrestling show. Jericho, looking a lot like Jon Bovi and showing signs of his age, was nevertheless having a lot of fun hosting the segment, almost breaking character but never quite. Vickie Guerrero maintained her professional composure, however, and tunelled onward with her lines! A fun watch. There needs to be more of these, where the face character is just having a lot of fun and very apparently so. Cena shouldn’t be the only one allowed that luxury.